Sharia Law Restricts Ability of Authorities to Prevent Attacks

Understanding the Threat pic
Understanding the Threat
Image: understandingthethreat.com

A former FBI agent and officer with the U.S. Marine Corps, John Guandolo is author of the 2013 book Raising a Jihadi Generation, which can be found at Amazon or on his site UnderstandingTheThreat.com. At the latter site, John Guandolo focuses on emerging threats posed by Islamic groups within the United States.

A recent post explores why more Muslims have not contacted authorities in Europe and North America and alerted them about potential jihadists in their midst. The basic reason is that it would violate Sharia, or Islamic Sacred Law, to do so.

Sharia makes it a violation of basic precepts to leave Islam and, further, makes it a capital crime to deny the tenets of Islamic law in any way. Restrictions extend to strict edicts against talebearing and slander, which means that Muslims place themselves in grave danger by assisting police in actions against fellow Muslims. This has limited the information-gathering capacities of authorities trying to stop major terrorist attacks.

Categories of Sharia Law

Understanding the Threat pic
Understanding the Threat
Image: understandingthethreat.com

John Guandolo is an expert in counterterrorism, security operations, and international security consulting with over two decades of experience in the public and private sectors. A retired marine and special agent for the FBI, John Guandolo also developed a training program for the FBI that focuses on threats from the Muslim Brotherhood and sharia law, which was the first of its kind at the bureau.

Sharia law is an Islamic moral code and set of religious laws. An Arabic word meaning “path to be followed,” sharia stems from the Islamic holy book the Quran and the teachings of the Islamic prophet Muhammad. Sharia includes components on beliefs, character, and actions, which include legal injunctions.

Classical sharia systems are practiced in countries such as Egypt, Afghanistan, and Iraq, where sharia law has an official status and covers most components of the legal system. Mixed systems have less sharia influence on the broad legal system and primarily cover family law. Countries that practice mixed sharia include Morocco, Lebanon, and Syria. Other Muslim countries such as Albania and Turkey have secular systems in which sharia yields no influence over the legal system.

Impact of Sharia Law in the United States

John Guandolo pic
John Guandolo
Image: shariahthethreat.org

Former FBI agent John Guandolo often leads discussions on how Islam and Sharia Law entered the mainstream political discussion during the years following the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks on the United States. The parameters of Sharia Law, also called Islamic Law, are often disputed among lawmakers, members of national security councils, and experts in Muslim culture. This debate has even made its way into federal court. John Guandolo is often looked to for guidance on the topic, especially in regard to national security issues.

Since 2001, many splinter organizations have developed across the globe. These groups follow the same terrorist ideologies that form what Guandolo refers to as the “Global Jihadist Movement,” which has a mission of spreading Sharia Law throughout the United States. As an expert in national security, Guandolo warns against allowing Sharia Law to gain a stronger hold in the United State than it already has. His position is that the Council on American-Islamic Relations is a strong proponent of introducing and implementing Sharia Law in the country.